New Business in The Bay

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    Melanie Smith in the Doorway of Cre8iveworx

Melanie Smith in the Doorway of Cre8iveworx

You may have noticed a cheerful little shop on the Parade opposite the Royal New Zealand Yacht club. In this small space, and outside as well, Melanie Smith has managed to squeeze an array of bright colourful items, arranged in such a way it makes a real picture.

This is not surprising given her arts background. She graduated at university in U.K in 2004 and wanted a business that uses her creative background. So Cre8iveworx was born, just before last Christmas.

Looking around, I see handmade silver jewellery; possum/merino hats, scarves, gloves and slippers (this is a very strong line); candles, creams and scents; chocolates, sauces and jams; ceramics; and children’s toys and accessories. Nearly everything is New Zealand made, many items handmade. Supporting artists throughout the country is her aim.

“My plan is to try and support as many artists as I can,” she said, “lots of people are busy making things and being creative.” She takes artists’ work in two ways: purchasing initially and payment upon sale.

“I also wanted a space where I could paint myself,” she said, pointing to a painting of hers. She works in oils and specialises in landscapes and cityscapes which are interpreted in abstract form. She specially enjoys painting large works. She likes making things too and will be bringing in her sewing machine over the winter months.

So when it’s raining and the shop isn’t busy, she will combine being a shopkeeper with being an artist --opening the door to her stock room to make a larger open space.

JCD, Bay View newsletter 67, May 2016